This message, related to the development of the theme, only displays on the localhost homepage to notify you of any important theme changes.


Version 2.0.0 - July 20, 2020

Below are the following changes that could be breaking changes for your site. For more details on any change, please refer to PR #154.

The major breaking change is:

  1. Users that have front matter that utilize images (backwards compatibility for featured and associated parameters still remains) will need to adjust from [images]="SRC" to the new format.
[[images]]
    src = "" // Link to image
    alt = "" // Alt text for image
    stretch = // Optional: See screenshots for referenced values and outcomes

If you utilize any of the following, there might be a breaking:

  1. User custom templates may require adjustment.
  2. User custom i18n languages, or custom templates referencing i18n translations may require adjustment.
  3. User custom template for comments will require adjustment if it uses the theme’s CSS and/or JS.
  4. User custom CSS may need to adjust due to a variety of class name changes and specificity changes.

While I realize this is inconvenient, I hope that it is worth it to you in the long run. Thanks for using the theme, and feel free to submit issues as needed.

rendle.dev

Mark Rendle's .NET development blog.

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Mark Rendle's blog about making software and stuff.